P1xels

The global salon for iphonic art and iphone photography.

Press

For press inquiries, please call Knox @ 510-612-6124.

February 3, 2012—An article in the San Francisco Chronicle about the Mobile Masters Sessions, iPhoneography Breaking Into Mainstream, at the 2013 Macworld in San Francisco, where I spoke and many P1xels’ artists were prominently featured.

We have gotten an amazing amount of press, in the form of features, interviews, and video/TV, in a very short time. Thank you to all the journalists around the world who have taken the time to share this art movement, the artists of P1xels and their art with the public.

November 29, 2012—A lovely feature about the Third Wave exhibition in the San Francisco Chronicle by Kimberly Chun

November 25, 2012—A great feature and gallery at the Huffington Post by John Seed. 

October 24, 2012—An interview in The App Whisperer.

May 2012A very perceptive review of our show and about iphonic art (ten Pixels’ artists were featured), Divergent Mediums: Photography vs. iPhoneography, at the Torpedo Factory Art Center in Alexandria, Virginia, by Michael O’Sullivan of the Washington Post.

January, 2012—A nice write-up in Hong Kong’s premier lifestyle magazine the Ming Pao Weekly.

January, 2012—Nice little write-up for the 1% in Mercedes-Benz Magazine of Australia.

December, 2011—Not an article, but P1xels is now featured on Flipboard in the “Cool Curators” section of featured feeds.(Apple’s iPad App Of The Year) for iPhone and iPad.

December, 2011—Actually, someone sent me a link to the Flipboard interview: On the Red Couch: Knox Bronson of P1xels at an Exhibition

Thanksgiving Day, 2011—A nice video feature on P1xels at the great site, Electric Playground. Thank you, Jason Fairbrother!

August 13, 2011—A very nice feature article in the Sydney Morning Herald, by Sacha Molitorisz

June 2011—A video feature, broadcast throughout the Middle East on Voice of America.

April 21, 2011—A recent piece by John Seed, art writer for the Huffington Post.

April 21, 2011—Another online write up about the OCCCA show.

December 2010—When Cult Of Mac, one of the web’s biggest Apple-centric blogs, wanted a year-end wrap-up, a gallery, and a discussion of the shape of things to come in the world of iphonic art, they came to Pixels, of course.

October 30, 2010—Mashable, the giant social networking and technology site named Pixels the #1 site for iPhone photography.
http://mashable.com/2010/10/30/iphone-photography-websites/

October 15, 2010—The Atlantic Monthly online published a fascinating article on the historical context of iphonography, comparing iphonography to the pictorialists of the early twentieth century. Both Pixels and Pixels’ artist Maia Panos were singled out.
http://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2010/10/hipstamatic-and-the-time-when-photographs-looked-like-paintings/64618/

February 2010—Jennifer Modenessi, who covers the SF Bay Area art and culture beat so well, has written a wonderful story about “Pixels At An Exhibition” in two East Bay papers, the Contra Costa Times and the Oakland Tribune in today’s editions.

She writes

When a flower or fog-enshrouded landscape catches Knox Bronson’s eye, he reaches for his iPhone.

It doesn’t matter that the cell phone camera lacks a flash. It doesn’t even matter that it can’t zoom. With a sharp eye, a handful of apps and some creative muscle, Bronson, a composer and singer, has all he needs to make a work of art.

In fact, the Berkeley resident is so enamored of the iPhone camera’s charms that he recently set up a Web site, www.pixelsatanexhibition.com, where anyone can submit photos taken with an iPhone.

Read the rest of the story here. Thank you, Jennifer!

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A gallery posting at the local TV Station KTVU, in Oakland, about our first show. Unfortunately the news feature video clip they broadcast link I once had seems to be no longer working.


Our first piece of press, the New York Times!
New York Times
December 28, 2009
iPhone Photos Become High Art in Gallery Competition

 

By KIM-MAI CUTLER of VentureBeat
When photography became commonplace in the late 19th century, it took several decades and pioneers like Alfred Stieglitz before it became accepted as fine art. Today, with ubiquitous cell phone cameras and now mobile live-video streaming, expect the divide between high and low art to become even narrower.

A San Francisco Bay Area gallery is testing that idea with a photo contest that asks people to submit their artiest iPhone-taken pictures. At between 2 and 3.2 megapixels, depending on the model, the iPhone has a weak camera compared to competitors. But Giorgi Gallery, which is running the competition, says, “The eye of the artist is always more important than the technology in the creation of beautiful art.” Two hundred winners will get prints of their photos shown at an exhibition in Berkeley next month.

Others galleries and institutions have also tried to hold up the iPhone as a more democratic tool for creating and distributing art. The New Yorker dabbled in iPhone-created covers created by the Brushes application earlier this year. Plus, there are several photo editing applications that give you basic tools to edit photos like Best Camera and Photogene. Adobe even created a version of Photoshop for the iPhone, but its features are very limited compared to what’s available in the proper application.

Gordon Fraser

Alex Racanelli

Will Reddy

Copyright 2009 VentureBeat. All Rights Reserved.


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from Parcbench Magazine
BEAUTY SO DIFFICULT
Written by Ralph Benko on December 29, 2009

 

iPhoto by Mikel Rouse, originally from the liner notes to Gravity Radio; www.MikelRouse.com

“Beauty is difficult, Yeats” said Aubrey Beardsley
when Yeats asked why he drew horrors
or at least not Burne-Jones
and Beardsley knew he was dying and had to
make his hit quickly

Hence no more B-J in his product.

So very difficult, Yeats, beauty so difficult.

So, famously, wrote Ezra Pound in Canto LXXX, recounting a cocktail party exchange between William Butler Yeats (Pound having served as Yeats’ personal secretary) and artist of the exquisite, the grotesque, the decadent, Aubrey Beardsley

Yet perhaps, thanks to the iPhone, the difficulty of beauty is no longer quite as true as it once was. An entirely new artistic medium is, perhaps, emerging: iPhontography, dedicated to photos taken on the iPhone.

Singer/songwriter Knox Bronson has recently published www.pixelsatanexhibition.com to the World Wide Web, a site with which this writer, entranced, is associating himself:

a site dedicated to iPhone photography, the wondrous digital imagery made with the iPhone, reaffirming, for us, anyway, that the eye of the artist is always more important than the technology in the creation of beautiful art.

For … a handful of clicks you may send along your iphontographs for review by the gallerist of a prominent Berkeley, California art gallery for consideration to be printed and hung in a show to take place early next year, and to be included in its catalogue. And may vote, and have your friends vote, on your artistry.

Or merely to go and marvel at the emergence of a new populist art form. Ah, the Web!

Political relevance? Zero.

High coolness factor? Priceless.


OakBook Magazine
December 8, 2009

 

Calling iPhone Photographers

Oakbook
Last Updated on December, 08 2009 at 03:52 PM
There are more than a 100,000 photos on Yahoo’s popular photo sharing site, Flickr, that have been taken with an iPhone. And most of them are way better than you expect pictures taken on a phone to be.“A folk art form has unfolded where the depiction of reality and spontaneous events has been assisted not through the sophistication of the camera, but through its ubiquitous presence in our everyday lives,” writes Oakland-based architect Rae Douglass, who runs Giorgi gallery.
There are more than a 100,000 photos on Yahoo’s popular photo sharing site, Flickr, that have been taken with an iPhone. And most of them are way better than you expect pictures taken on a phone to be.“A folk art form has unfolded where the depiction of reality and spontaneous events has been assisted not through the sophistication of the camera, but through its ubiquitous presence in our everyday lives,” writes Oakland-based architect Rae Douglass, who runs a local art gallery – Giorgi gallery.With that in mind, he and Knox Bronson, a local musician/graphic designer/ photographer, are collaborating on a show that will only exhibit photos taken on an iPhone. “The iPhone’s camera is a pretty basic camera,” says Knox. “Other phones have more advanced cameras. So, in my mind, if you can take good photos with the constrains of an iPhone – it doesn’t even have a zoom -that’s interesting.”
Here’s their call for submissions for Pixels at an Exhibition. They’re inviting artists and non-artists alike to send in their iPhone photos. The deadline is January 15:

iPhone images are crude with low resolution, so they can only be judged by their basic composition and the manner at which they capture the moment. With this show, we are not looking for seductive images loaded with technique, but images that are alive with the ephemeral spirit of reality. Two hundred images will be printed and displayed in the gallery for the month of February 2010, and will be sold as individual works of art. A book will be published that will include all of the images along with names and a short bio of each iPhonetographer.


We welcome all applicants and encourage amateurs, since there is no such thing as a professional iPhonetographer. For many of the artists, this will be their first introduction to having their work shown in a gallery, and we look forward to the chance to discover new talent.

For more information on submitting your iPhone pics, visit http://pixelsatanexhibition.com/

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